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, beginning at 7:30. >>> and now to the disaster in japan, where contamination levels at a damaged nuclear power plant have now reached new highs. the amount of radiation in the water that's been flooding the fukushima plant spiked today to levels 100,000 times higher than normal. higher levels of radiation were also found in the soil and the sea water along the japanese coast. the contamination is believed to be the result of a partial meltdown in the core of the complex following the march 11th earthquake and tsunami. another strong 6.5 aftershock rattled that country this morning, adding to the sense of unease for people there. and some students from fukushima are here in our area, visiting an elementary school in did yourwood, maryland. jane watrel is in our newsroom with that story. jane? >> wendy, the family has relatives in montgomery county, and since schools in their hometown are being used as disaster centers, they came to the area ahead of spring break, wanting to share their story with localel school children. >> my name is damaki. i'm 12 years old. >> reporter: a lesson in the
and serious. that's how japan's prime minister described the fight to stabilize that damaged nuclear power plant there. plant officials fear there is a possible breach in the core of the reactor. that could mean even more radioactive contamination. the uncertain situation has brought a stop to the work at the complex. it's just too dangerous. people living within 18 miles of the reactor are now being told to evacuate as a precaution. before today, residents were just told to stay indoors. the official death toll from the quake ask tsunami now tops 10,000, another 17,000 are still missing. the earthquake hit two weeks ago today. >>> the crisis in japan has many wondering about safety of our own nuclear power plants. >> there are 104 facilities in this country, maryland's calavert cliff plant produces enough power to energize a city the size of baltimore. >> as derrick ward reports tonight, officials say a situation like the one in japan is unlikely here, but they're ready, just in case. >> reporter: the calvert cliffs nuclear plant rests 40 feet above sea level with concrete designed to wit
in libya could still continue after that. >>> two workers at a damaged nuclear power plant in japan were hospitalized today after they were exposed to high levels of radiation. officials say the worker stepped in some contaminated water while they were laying electrical cables in the basement of one u unit. the level of radiation in the tap water, meanwhile, in tokyo has gone down. that water was deemed safe for babies to drink now. but fears linger, and supplies of bottled water are scarce. the official death toll from that earthquake tsunami now rose again 9,800 now confirmed dead. 17,000 still missing. >> back close to home, the numbers aren't good. only 31% of district voters approve of may your vincent gray's performance. tom sherwood asked the mayor how he plans to turn things around. >> reporter: district mayor vincent gray was giving a pep talk thursday to city workers, trying to boost homeownership and housing in the city. but a new opinion poll just two months into his term shows mayor gray needs to boost his own standing with city voters who elected him last year. >> we'll dri
to change. >>> a teacher from virginia went on a mission to japan and found herself caught in the middle of a devastating earthquake and tsunami. >>> but we begin with that case of murder at the lululemon store, and a new answer as to why one woman would allegedly beat a co-worker to death. good evening, i'm wendy rieger. >> and i'm jim vance. dorene is off tonight. 28-year-old brittney norwood appeared in court in rockville today. she was the victim turned suspect now in the murder of jana murray, and a murder this month at the lululemon store in bethesda. for the first time, prosecutors revealed that an alleged fight over
their forces. >>> the death toll in japan is climbing as expected. the official count from that massive quake and tsunami has now passed 9,000, and 13,000 remain missing. the search and rescue effort is winding down. shifting gears to recovery mode. significant amounts of aid are finally making it to the coastal towns. but crews are just starting to restore power and water to some of the highly impacted areas. >>> meanwhile, workers continue to try and cool the reactors at the fukushima nuclear plant in japan. the crisis has raised several questions about the safety of our own reactors, especially those built decades ago. kristen dahlgren has a look. >> reporter: fears of a similar situation could unfold in american plants. there are currently 104 nuclear reactors in the u.s., four more under construction. and another 13 applications filed for new units. >> if it's done right, there is very little risk. but we have to make sure that it's done right. >> reporter: doing it right means keeping radiation contained. at the center of any disaster scenario, losing the ability to keep nuclear materia
in virginia, maryland and even japan. to his students, kevin ricks was a popular teacher who went out of his way to befriend them. to prosecutors and the officers who investigated him, ricks is a serial predator. >> this case is a chilling reminder to parents and kids that sometimes the face of evil is the familiar and the everyday, and sometimes even seemingly respected role models. >> reporter: the guilty plea to seven counts of possession and production of child pornography. ricks was a teenager himself, a 19-year-old virginia counselor a virginia summer camp when he set his sights on his first victim, a deaf boy. >> his first victim was an 11-year-old deaf boy at a camp for disabled kids. whose parents were going through a divorce, who didn't have a place to live. and mr. ricks invited him to his home, ostensibly to host him. and then abused him. >> reporter: the pattern was repeated over and over. when ricks was in college, when he moved to japan to teach. in federalsburg, maryland, where he abused the foreign exchange students he hosted and finally as a teacher in manassas when a paren
a replacement. >>> now to the water disaster in japan. there are new concerns about the safety of the food and water after that march 11th earthquake and tsunami. officials stay tap water in tokyo is now showing elevated levels of radiation. parents are being told to stop giving that tap water to their infants and there has been a run on bottled water as a result. radiation has been detected in some vegetables and some raw milk in japan. >>> president obama says there will be no land invasion to oust moammar gadhafi. the president said that option is, quote, absolutely out of question. military analysts stay u.s. has spent upwards of a billion dollars on the effort so far. mean while, allied forces are attacking libyan government forces that have been storming population centers. and nato ships are patrolling off the coast to enforce an arms embargo. next at 5:00, food for thought. what researchers say about mercury levels in fish. and its link to heart disease. >>> plus, a crime crackdown. investigators are able to get more than 130 illegal immigrants off the streets in a matter of days.
nuclear plants in japan. two more workers were drenched with radioactive water that gushed from a pipe at the complex. the plant has been leaking radiation and other toxic substances since it was damaged by the earthquake and tsunami earlier this month. today japan's government admitted safeguards at the facility were insufficient, and it vowed to overhaul safety standards. more than 11,000 deaths have now been reported after the tsunami. hundreds of thousands of people are still in shelters, their homes and livelihoods destroyed. damages could top $310 billion, making it the most expensive natural disaster on record. >>> we had a beautiful day today. but another round of rain and snow moving into the region. >> veronica johnson's tracking the weather. tell us how much and when we're going to get it. >> how much, quite a bit coming our way over the next couple of days. because it's not just one storm, wendy and pat, it's several storms that are going to be moving through. and one even up the coast. you know what that means, because we're talking about wintry type conditions. it means w
restrictions on drilling. and the crisis in japan. saying nuclear still has potential. >> i'm determined and sure pits safe. >> reporter: today a senate subcommittee wrestled with the question of what to do with america's nuclear plant waste. >> we've failed to manage the risk from our irradiated power plants. >>> while the administration continued its efforts to turn attention to energy, republicans accused the president and democrats of -- >> fake solutions that only aim to distract people from what they're really up to. >> reporter: back at the gas station, there is little care about politics. only pain. >> i just shake my head. i know that's -- >> reporter: as gas prices continue their rise. >> as for how to pay for the president's plan, he said we'll have to cut in some places to invest in energy. he warned those who want to slash research, he believes they leave america paying an even bigger price. nbc news, washington. >>> still ahead on news4 at 5:00, one city councilmember's unique i >>> this week's wednesday's child 140ed us she has a lot of talent for dancing. when she first s
there for weeks, trying to learn more about the identities of those rebels. >> as the disaster in japan continues to unfold, there's more evidence the tsunami damaged nuclear complex is still leaking radiation. the ground water under one reactor is now showing radiation levels 10,000 times higher than they should be. and radiation in the sea water near the plant has also grown to nearly 4,400 times the amount allowed by law. the government is being pressured to extend the evacuation zone around the plant. here in the states, the epa announced it found trace amounts of radioactive iodine in milk after tests were conducted in california and washington state. authorities say the levels were minute and pose no health threat. >>> back at home, a group of american university students rallied against the administration over sexual assault funding. >> what do we want? vawa. >> when do we want it? >> now. >> students learned last week the university did not submit an application to receive a $300,000 grant to prevent sexual assaults on campus. the grant would fund resources for survivors and educational p
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10